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Kanji, Hanmoon, Hanzi, Part 12, 感じ(かんじ)(kanji), 한문 (hanmoon), and Chinese Characters Used In China

We are working on stroke order now. Stroke order is extremely important if you plan to write any of these characters. As I explained in my last blog, they use stroke order because if anyone messes up while they are writing, everyone makes the same mistake, and the characters can still be read. Most of the time, the stroke order says: 1) They are written from left to right. 2) They are written from top to bottom. 3) Horizontal lines are usually written before vertical lines.

Some of the characters have an exception in the stroke order. Here is an example: 王. This character means “king.” The stroke order is 1) the horizontal line across the top 2) The vertical line in the middle 3) The horizontal line in the middle 4) The horizontal line at the bottom. This character means “king.” In Japanese, it is pronounced: お (o). In Korean, it is pronounced: 왕 (wang). In Chinese, it is pronounced: wang.

彼は王です (kare wa o desu.) = He is the king. = 그는 왕 이예요. (kunun wang eeyeyo) =
他是國王 (Tā shì guówáng)

Japanese: 王 = king. In Japanese, this is pronounced: お (o).

Korean: 王 = king. In Korean, this is pronounced: 왕 (wang).

Chinese: 王 = king. In Chinese, this is pronounced: wang.

イエスは 王さま でづ。(iesu wa o sama desu.) = Jesus is king.

예수는 왕 이예요. (yesu nun wang eeyeyo) = Jesus is king.

耶穌是國王 (yesu si gouwang) = Jesus is king.

The さま (sama) on the end of 王 (o), “king,” in Japanese is an honorific which gives respect to the king. Probably, the 國 (gou) in Chinese is the same, and honorific since just “wang” means “king,” 耶穌 (Yesu) means “Jesus,” and 是 (si) means “is.”

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The next rule for writing these characters is: If the character is symmetric, start in the middle, then move to the left, and then to the right. An example of this is: 小. You can see the bottom of the middle stroke slants toward the left because you start in the middle, and then go to the left. This kanji, hanmoon, or hanzi means “little” or “small.” In Japanese, this is pronounced: ちいさい (chiisai). If you add a little bit to it in Japanese: 少し (すこし)(sukoshi), it means ” a little bit.” In Korean, this is pronounced 작은 (jakun) as the adjective and 작다 (jakdah) or 작아요 (jakah-yo) as the verb used at the end of the sentence that means “is small” or “is little.” In Chinese, this is pronounced: xiăo. In Chinese, beside “little” or “small,” it can also mean: tiny, young, few, and tabloid.

赤ちゃんは小さいです. (akachiyan wa chiisai desu.) = The baby is small. = 아기는 작아요. (ahghee nun jaka-yo). =嬰兒很小. (Yīng’ér hěn xiǎo)

Japanese: 小さい = small, little. In Japanese, this is pronounced: ちいさい (chiisai). It can also be: 少し(すこし) (sukoshi) which means “a little bit.”

Korean: 小 = small, little. In Korean, this is pronounced: 작은 (jakun) as the adjective. As the verb, it is pronounced 작다 (jakdah) or 작아요 (jakah-yo). “A little bit,” in Korean is similar to this, and it is “적음” (jeokum). In Korean, when it ends with an ㅁ (m), it is a noun.

Chinese: 小 = small, little. In Chinese, this is pronounced: xiăo. It also means: tiny, young, few, and tabloid in Chinese. To say “a little bit” in traditional Chinese, it is: 一點點 (yidian dian), In modern Chinese, this is: 一点点, and the still pronounced it: yi dian dian.

日本語ができますか?(nihongo ga dekimasuka) = Do you speak Japanese? はい、少しできます。(hai, sukoshi dekimasu.) = Yes, a little bit.

한국말을 할 수 있어요? (hangook mal ul hal soo eesseoyo) = Do you speak Korean? 예, 적음 할 수 있어요. (ye, jeokum hal soo eesseoyo) = Yes, a lttle bt.

你會說中文嗎?(Nǐ huì shuō zhōngwén ma) = Do you speak Chinese? 是有點。(Shì yǒudiǎn) = Yes, a little bit. Simplified Chinese:
你会说中文吗?(Nǐ huì shuō zhōngwén ma?) = Do you speak Chinese. 是有点。(yǒudiǎn) = yes, a little bit.
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これは水です。(kore wa mizu desu) = This is water. = 이것은 물 이예요. (eegeosun mool eeyeyo) =這是水 (Zhè shì shuǐ)

This character is another one that the stroke order begins in the middle, the proceeds to the left, and then to the right side. If you look at the bottom of this character, you can see that the mark in the middle ends pointing to the left because the pen began at the top, went to the bottom, and then went toward the left: 水. This means “water.” In Japanese, it is pronounced: みず (mizu). In Korean, it is pronounced: 물 (mool), 수 (soo), or 용수 (yongsoo). I actually think there is a word in Japanese that is like the Korean 수 (soo) that means water too, but I am having trouble finding where it is written. In Chinese, it is pronounced: shui.

Japanese: 水 = water. In Japanese, this is pronounced: みず (mizu).

Korean: 水 = water. In Korean, this is pronounced: 물 (mool), 수 (soo), or 용수 (yongsoo).

Chinese: 水 = water. In Chinese, this is pronounced: shui.

彼は水をもみます (kare wa mizu wo nomimasu) = He drinks water.

그는 불을 마셔요 (kunun mool ul mahshyeoyo) = He drinks water.

他喝水 (Tā hē shuǐ) = He drinks water.
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