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Kanji, Hanmoon, and Hanzi, Part 5, 感じ(かんじ)(kanji), 한문 (hanmoon), and Chinese Characters used in China

For the last two blogs, I presented some 象形文字 (shokei moji), pictorial characters. I will give you a couple more in this blog, but also add some 指示文字 (shiji moji). 指示文字 are characters that use points and lines to express abstract concepts that have no particular shape like prepositions, numbers, adjectives. etc. The number of 指示文字 is even less than the number of 象形文字.

Let’s start with a couple more 象形文字. If you read the series I did that was just on 感じ(かんじ)(kanji) and 한문 (hanmoon), you have seen these characters.

The first character looks like a rice field, and it means “rice field”: 田. I actually can see the rice field sectioned off the way rice fields are. In Japanese, this is pronounced: た (ta). In Korean, this is pronounced: 논 (non). In traditional Chinese, this has a little bit added to it: 稻田, and is pronounced: Dàotián.

Japanese: 田 = rice field. In Japanese hiragana (ひらがな), this is た (ta).

Korean: 田 = rice field. In Korean hangul (한굴), this is 논 (non).

Chinese: 稻田 = rice field. In traditional Chinese, this hanzi (Chinese character) is pronounced: Dàotián.

田んぼに 稲が あります (tanbo ni ine ga arimasu.) = There is rice in the rice field.

(The kanji for “rice” here: 稲 (ine) is the same character used with 田 in Chinese to make “rice field.” In the orient, they usually have two words for “rice.” One is for uncooked rice, and the other is for cooked rice. The word for cooked rice in Japanese is ごはん(米) (gohan). The word “gohan” is also used for “meal.”)

논에 쌀 있어요. (non eh ssahl eesseoyo) = There is rice in the rice field.

(The 한문 (hanmoon): 米 which means “cooked rice” is 밥 (bahb) in Korean (한국 말), and 稲, the 한문 for uncooked rice is pronounced 논 (non) in Korean.)

稻田裡有米飯 (Dàotián lǐ yǒu mǐfàn) = There is rice in the rice field.
(熟米飯 (Shú mǐfàn)  is "cooked rice" in traditional Chinese. 白飯 (Báifàn) means "uncooked rice." 稻 is the hanzi for rice in a rice field.)
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Japanese: 雨 = rain. In Japanese hiragana (ひらがな)this is あめ (ame).

Korean: 雨 = rain. In Korean hangul (한굴) this is 비 (bee).

Chinese: 雨 = rain. In traditional Chinese, this is “yu.”


昨日雨が降った (kino ame ga futta) = It rained yesterday.

(昨日 (kino) means “yesterday.” I hope you can see the kanji in it that means “day”: 日 which is pronounced ひ (hi) by itself. )

어제 비가 내겼어요. (eojay bee gah nehryeosseoyo) = It rained yesterday.

昨天下雨了 (Zuótiān xià yǔlez) = It rained yesterday. 
(昨天 (zuotian) is "yesterday" in traditional Chinese.  You can see the similarities between this hanzi and the 昨日, the Japanese kanji that means "yesterday" (きの)(kino). The character: 下 means "down" which means the rain is coming down. The character 天 means "Heaven" which means that the rain is falling down from Heaven.) 
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Now it is time for the 指示文字 (shijimoji), the characters that express something abstract.

Japanese: = big. In Japanese, this is おおきい (o-oki-i).

Korean: = big. In Korean, this is 큰 (kun) as just the adjective or 켜요 (kyeoyo) or 큰다 (kundah) as the adjective style verb. 켜요 (kyeoyo) is the form used in polite conversation at the end of the sentence. 큰다 (kundah) is the form you find in the dictionary and written on the page. Use 큰 (kun) before the noun.

Chinese: = big. In traditional Chinese, this is pronounced: da.

This character is supposed to be a large man standing with his arms out and legs spread apart to signify “big”: .

この 人は その人 より 大 です (kono hito wa sono hito yori ookii desu.) = This person is bigger than that person.

이 사람이 저 사람 보다 더 켜요 (ee saram ee cho saram boda deo kyeoyo) = This person is bigger than that person.

這個人比那個人大。(Zhège rén bǐ nàgè réndà.) = This person is bigger than that person. (If you remember from other lessons, "ren" is how to say "person" in traditional Chinese, and you can see the hanzi: 人.)
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Japanese: = small. In Japanese hiragana (ひらがな), this is ちさい (chisai).

Korean: = small. In Korean hangul (한굴), this is 작은 (jakun) as an adjective and 작아요 (jakah-yo) as the adjective style verb.

Chinese: = small. In traditional Chinese, this is “xiăo.”

If you compare this character: to the character for “big”: , then you can see that in , the legs are together and the arms are down instead of out to signify it is small.

このひとはそのひとよりもです。(kono hito wa sono hito yori mo chisai desu.) = This person is smaller than that person.

이 사람 이 저사람 보다 더 작아요 (ee saram ee jeo saram boda deo jakayo) = This person is smaller than that person.

這個人比這個人小 (Zhège rén bǐ zhège rén xiǎo.) = This person is smaller than that person. 

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