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Explaining Romanian Grammar in Matthew 2:17 & 18

In the last Romanian grammar blog I did from Matthew 2:16, I told you that a prophet had prophesied the things that happened in that verse. The verse talks about when Herod decided to go out and kill all the babies two years old and under in Bethlehem and all the surrounding areas because he was threatened by the existence of Jesus. It is an actual historical happening written in history. I kept telling you before that just how bad King Herod was, and if you are following along in your Bibles, you just read what he did, but it is not the first time he had killed someone. Everyone he killed was because he wanted to be king so badly. This time, it was mass murder of babies. Now, Matthew points out to us that this was prophesied in the Old Testament in the book of Jeremiah was written in 626-586 B. C., but Jesus wasn’t even born until 4 B. C., and Jesus was about 2 years old when this happened. It is amazing that the prophets actually knew before hand what would happen around the time of the birth of the Messiah, and everything they said came true!

Biblia e cuvantul lui Dumnezeu. (The Bible is the word of God.)Photo by Nitin Arya on Pexels.com

Matei 2:17: Atunci s-a implinit ce fusese vestit prin prorocul Ieremia, care zice:

Atunci = “then.” It is pronounced “ahtoonch.” Any time there is an “I” or an “e” after a “c,” it is pronounced like the English “ch.”

s-a implinit = “it fulfilled itself.” “S-a” is a contraction that us actually “se a.” “Se” is a reflexive pronoun, and since it is talking about the prophecy, then here, “se” means “itself.” “A” is the prefix to “implinit.” It makes “a implinit” into past perfect compus when coupled with the “t” on the end of “implinit.” “A implini” means “to fulfill.” The “a implinit” is in third person singular because of the “a” in front of “implinit.” Often past perfect compus is used as simple present tense in English, so “a implinit” translated as “it fulfilled,” however, in English, we need a direct object with the verb “fulfilled.” “Fulfilled” is called a “transitive verb” because it needs a direct object. This is an important thing to know about a verb if you are studying foreign languages so you don’t make mistakes. The Romanian has supplied the direct object by putting the “se” before the verb. That “se” is a direct object pronoun.

In the last Romanian grammar blog I did from Matthew 2:16, I told you that a prophet had prophesied the things that happened in that verse. The verse talks about when Herod decided to go out and kill all the babies two years old and under in Bethlehem and all the surrounding areas because he was threatened by the existence of Jesus. It is an actual historical happening written in history. I kept telling you before that just how bad King Herod was, and if you are following along in your Bibles, you just read what he did, but it is not the first time he had killed someone. Everyone he killed was because he wanted to be king so badly. This time, it was mass murder of babies. Now, Matthew points out to us that this was prophesied in the Old Testament in the book of Jeremiah was written in 626-586 B. C., but Jesus wasn’t even born until 4 B. C., and Jesus was about 2 years old when this happened. It is amazing that the prophets actually knew before hand what would happen around the time of the birth of the Messiah, and everything they said came true!

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Biblia e cuvantul lui Dumnezeu. (The Bible is the word of God.)Photo by Nitin Arya on Pexels.com

Matei 2:17: Atunci s-a implinit ce fusese vestit prin prorocul Ieremia, care zice:

Atunci = “then.” It is pronounced “ahtoonch.” Any time there is an “I” or an “e” after a “c,” it is pronounced like the English “ch.”

s-a implinit = “it fulfilled itself.” “S-a” is a contraction that us actually “se a.” “Se” is a reflexive pronoun, and since it is talking about the prophecy, then here, “se” means “itself.” “A” is the prefix to “implinit.” It makes “a implinit” into past perfect compus when coupled with the “t” on the end of “implinit.” “A implini” means “to fulfill.” The “a implinit” is in third person singular because of the “a” in front of “implinit.” Often past perfect compus is used as simple present tense in English, so “a implinit” translated as “it fulfilled,” however, in English, we need a direct object with the verb “fulfilled.” “Fulfilled” is called a “transitive verb” because it needs a direct object. This is an important thing to know about a verb if you are studying foreign languages so you don’t make mistakes. The Romanian has supplied the direct object by putting the “se” before the verb. That “se” is a direct object pronoun.

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El citeste vestea in ziarul. (He reads the news in the newspaper.)Photo by Ekrulila on Pexels.com

Ce fusese vestit = “What had been announced.” This “ce” is a relative pronoun meaning “what.” Because it has an “e” after the “c,” the “c” must be pronounced like the English “ch.” “Ce” begins a relative clause. Remember, a clause must have a subject and a verb, but may or may not be the main clause, and so may be dependent on the rest of the sentence. A relative clause is not a sentence alone. This relative clause is actually used as a direct object clause because it answers the question “what?” “What was fulfilled?” The answer: “ce fusese vesit” (what had been announced). “Fusese” comes from “a fi.” “A fi” means “to be.” “Fusese” is third person singular, past perfect tense. In past perfect tense, it begins in the past, continues for a while in the past, and then finishes in the past. In English, the past perfect of “to be” is “had been.” “Fusese” is also third person singular. That means the pronoun “it” is also in “fusese.” “Vestit” comes from “a vesti” which basically means to be “famously announced.” If you watch the news in Romania, you are watching “veste.” “Vestit” is the past participle that is used like an adjective like we use the past participle “announced” in English.

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Prorocul a vestit despre copii. (The prophet announced about the children.)Photo by Aa Dil on Pexels.com

Prin prorocul Ieremia = “Through the prophet Jeremiah.” “Prin” is a preposition that means “through.” “Prorocul” means “the prophet,” and along with “Ieremia” is the object of the preposition. The “ul” on the end of “proroc” means “the,” It is a masculine, singular “the” to match “proroc” (prophet.) “Ieremia” is pronounced “yehrehmeeah.” When there is a “J” that begins a name, it is usually an “I” in Romanian, and it is pronounced like one of our “y’s.”

care zice = “Which says.” “Care” (which) is pronounced “kahray.” “Zice” is pronounced “zeechay.” Remember, if there is an “e” after the “c,” it is pronounced like the English “ch.” “Zice” comes from “a zice.” “A zice” means “to say.” “Zice” is third person singular simple present tense. This means that it happens all the time, and that the pronoun imbedded is “it” because we are still talking about the prophecy.

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El citeste Biblia sa seafla despre Dumnezeu. (He reads the Bible to find out about God.) Photo by Eduardo Braga on Pexels.com

Let’s put this verse all together: “Then it fulfilled itself, what had been announced widely through the prophet Jeremiah, which says:”

This verse is only like a introduction to the next verse, so I decided to do both verses in this blog. Next, we get the prophecy that comes from Jeremiah 31:15 and happened shortly after the birth of Christ when he was in Egypt.

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Femeilor au plans. = The women cried. Photo by Kat Jayne on Pexels.com

Matei 2: 18: ,,Un tipat s-a auzit in Rama plangere si bocet mult; Rehaela isi jelea copiii si nu voia sa fie mangaiata, pentru ca nu mai erau.”

,,Un tipat = “a scream.” “Un” means “one” or “a.” “Tipat” should have a comma attached to the bottom of the “t” and means “scream.” “Un” is an indefinite article, so it isn’t telling you which scream. “Tipat” is the subject of the first part of the sentence. The reason for the two marks before “Un” is that they are quotation marks because this is a quotation from the Old Testament, from Jeremiah 31:15. If you read it, it will have the exact words that are here. In Romanian, the quotation marks at the beginning go on the bottom, and the ones at the end go on the top.

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Ei au auzit un tipat. = They heard a scream. Photo by Godisable Jacob on Pexels.com

s-au auzit = “they heard it.” “It” is actually the “s” part of the contraction “s-au.” The “au” part of the contraction tells you coupled with the “t” on the end of “auzit” that this is third person plural present perfect compus, the verb tense the Romanians use like we use simple past tense in English. “Au auzit” comes from “a auzi” which means “to hear,” so “au auzit” means “they heard.” “Hear” is a transitive verb which means it needs a direct object, and we have “it” given to us in Romanian through “se” from “s-au.” Our intransitive verb that doesn’t need a direct object like this is “to listen.” “Au auzit” is the main verb of the first part of the sentence.

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In ziua de azi, Rama e parte de Ierusalem. (Now a days, Rama is part of Jerusalem.) Photo by Haley Black on Pexels.com

in Rama = “in Rama.” This is a prepositional phrase. “In” means the same thing it does in English, but it is pronounced differently in Romanian. In Romanian “in” has an inverted “v” over the “i.” This means we don’t have this letter in English. It is pronounced way down in the throat like a grunt. “In” is the preposition and “Rama” is the object of the preposition. “Rama” is not a Romanian word. It is the name of a place, and we use the same word in English. Part of present day Jerusalem is “Rama.” In the Old testament, it was sometimes called Rama, and sometimes called “Ramoth-Gilead.” It was a city established by the tribe of Benjamin in the Old Testament. It would have been in the surrounding area where Herod was having all the babies killed.

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Tot femeilor au facut mult plagere si bocet.(All the women did a lot of crying and mourning.) Photo by Mikoto on Pexels.com

plangere si bocet mult = ” a lot of grieving and lamenting.” “Plangere” means “crying.” “A plange” means “to cry.” “Plangand” is the actual gerund to be used as our gerund (noun), “crying.” However, this “plangere” is more powerful than “crying.” It is more like a plural form of “grieving,” except we can’t make it plural in English. The translator is trying to make the reader feel how bad things were really going to be when this happened. The first “a” in “plangere” has an inverted “v” over it, so you don’t pronounce it like an “a.” You pronounce it down in your throat, a letter that is not in English. Any tine there is an “e” or an “i” after a “g” in Romanian, the “g” is pronounced like a “j.” “Si” is pronouned like the English word “she,” and means “and.” The “s” is “she” because it normally has a comma on the bottom of it. “Plangere si bocet” is the compound direct object of the first part of the sentence.

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In Europa si in America se imbracam in negru daca cineva moare, dar in Corea si in Bangladesi, ei se imbracam in alb daca cineva moare. (In Europe and in America, we dress ourselves in black if someone dies, but in Korea and in Bangladeshi, they dress in white if someone dies. Photo by Tuấn Kiệt Jr. on Pexels.com

“Bocet” can mean “lamenting,” “crying,” “wailing,” or a “dirge.” They are all pretty sad. They are crying after a death. “Bocet” is pronounced “bohchet.” Remember, that “c” has an “e” after it, so it must be pronounced “ch,” and the “o’s” in Romanian are always pronounced like a long “o” in English. “Mult” means “a lot” or “much.” Anything that tells about a noun in Romanian needs to come after that noun instead of before like in English, so it is as the end of the noun phrase.


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Rehaela nu era fericita cum e aici. (Rachel wasn’t happy like she is here.)Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

;Rehaela isi jelea copiii = “Racheal mourns herself for her children.” First of all, you will notice I included the semi-colon (;). If a semi-colon is used, it means that the meaning of what is on both sides of the semi-colon is so interconnected that the author thought they should be in one sentence, but grammatically, they couldn’t put them there, but they can if they use a semi-colon between them. What is on either side of the semi-colon must be complete sentences. “Rehaela” means “Rachel.” We can see that “Rehaela” is the subject of this part of the sentence easily because she is doing the action of the verb. “Isi” is pronounced “uhsh” with the “uh” being said down in your throat because the “i” has an inverted “v” over it and the “s” has a comma attached to the bottom. The last “I” on the end of the word is barely pronounced, so I didn’t write it in the pronunciation. At times, you don’t hear it at all, but everyone knows it is there.

If you go looked for “jelea” in the dictionary, it won’t be there. It is not a very common word in Romanian. I am not sure why the translator used it, but it means “mourning.” The word “copiii” here is quite interesting. If you say “copil,” it means “a child.” If you say, “copilul,” it means “the man child.” If you say, “copila” it means “a female child” or “the female child.” If you say “copii,” it means “children,” If you say “copiii” it means “the children.” They just keep adding those “i’s.” “Copiii” is pronounced, “kohpeee.” It is important to say that if you aren’t sure who “Rachel” (Rahaela) is, you can read Genesis and find her there. She is one of the old mothers of the Jewish people. She is a kind of symbol for Jewish mothers here.


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Ea nu a avut voia sa fie mangaiata. (She refused to be comforted.)Photo by Kat Jayne on Pexels.com

Si nu voia sa fie mangaiata = “and she didn’t want to be comforted.” “Si” means “and,” and is pronounced like our English “she,” again. “Nu” means “no” or “not.” “Voia” is a kind of word that means “to have will” or “be willing.” It may be in some form in the dictionary, but I can’t find it there. It is like “she didn’t have the will.” “Sa fie” is the infinitive form used in the sentence for “a fi” which means “to be.” Both “sa fie” and “a fi” mean “to be.” but you use “sa fie” in a sentence, and you look “a fi” up in the dictionary. “Mangaiata” means “comforted.” It is the past participle used as an adjective just like it is in English. “Voia” is pronounced “voyah.” “Mangaiata” is a big more complicated to explain to ypu how it is pronounced because it has letters that are not in English. The first and the second “a’s” are the ones with an inverted “v” over them that are pronounced way down in your throat like a grunt. The “i” is pronounced “ee.” The next “a” is pronouned like the “a” in “father.” The last “a” has a smile from a happy face that looks like a sideways parenthesis over it: “),” so is pronounced “uh.” And of course, that “t” is pronounced with your tongue hitting the top of your mouth on the ridge right behind the teeth and hitting the teeth at the same time. The “m” and the “n” are the same as English and the “g” is a hard “g” like in “good.” You pronounce each letter and blend them together as you go. It is much easier to learn to pronounce words like this by hearing them than having to have them described to you. However, it isn’t expedient for everyone to head for Romanian or for my house once a day, so we do the best we can.


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Irod a murit tot copiii. (Herod killed all the children.)Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

pentru ca = “because.

nu mai erau = “they were no more.” “Nu” means “no” here and is pronounced “new.” “Mai” means “more” and is pronounced “mah-ee.” “Erau” is third person plural past tense. This means that “they” is embedded here. The verb that “erau” comes from is “a fi,” (to be). The kind of Romanian tense it is called is “imperfect past,” and it coincides with our simple past tense. In simple past tense, it happens all at once and then is finished right then. The soldiers sent from Herod had made work work of these babies.

Let’s put this verse all together: “They heard a scream in Rama, a lot of grieving and lamenting; Racheal mourns for her children and refuses to be comforted because they were no more.”

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Cum, adica?! Cum Ieremiah au stiut? (How, I mean, how did Jeremiah know?)Photo by John-Mark Smith on Pexels.com

Yes, Jeremiah saw that this would happen way back somewhere between 626-586 B. C, and it happened when Jesus was 2 years old, in 2 B. C. while Jesus was in Egypt. Jesus escaped this mass murder by Herod because God warned Joseph through an angel in his dream. We can really see the hand of God intervening here to protect his son. Jesus was sent to teach us how to find God, and it just wouldn’t have done if God had let him be killed right out the gate. God protected Jesus so he could grow up and we could learn his message. God had taken on the form of man through Jesus. God moves in our lives too, but we don’t always know when it is happening. However, many people have looked back and said, “That could only have been God.” In this instance, here it could only have been God, Matthew points it out to us.

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Dumnezeu exista. (God exists.) Cineva in Turcea a pictat poza aceasta inatinte oameni acolo au devenit Musulman prin forta. (Someone in Turkey painted this picture before people there became Muslims by force.) Mult de scrissoarele din Noul Testamentul era trimis catre biserici in Turcea.(Many of the letters in the New Testament were sent to churches in Turkey.) Muslulmani a pictat de a supra poza aceasta si nu au stiut era acolo pentru multi ani. (The Muslims painted over this picture, and didn’t know it was there for many years.) Dar cineva a decis sa faca restoratia, si a gasit o. (But, someone decided to do restoration, and found it.)(Photo by Emre Can on Pexels.com

Matthew is just mounting up evidence upon evidence to say that Jesus is the one that God told the prophets in the Old Testament that he would send:

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Photo by JUAN CARLOS LEVA on Pexels.com

1. Matthew 1: 22 & 23. Jesus was born of a virgin, and it was prophesied in Isaiah 7:14 in the year 740 B. C. Matthew was written between 50-70 A. D.

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Photo by Jonathan Meyer on Pexels.com

2. Men came from India looking for Jesus to bring him gifts after his birth. (Matthew 2:1, Psalms 72:10 and Isaiah 60:6) I told you wen Matthew and Isaiah were written, and Psalms was written over a long period of time in Old Testament times.It was the hymn book used in the Old Testament temple.

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Photo by Haley Black on Pexels.com

3. Jesus was born in Bethlehem. (Matthew 2:6, Micah 5:2). Micah was written between 750-686 B. C.

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Photo by Murat Şahin on Pexels.com

4. Joseph takes Jesus and his mother to live in Egypt (Matthew 2: 13-15 & Hosea 11:1).

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Photo by Daisa TJ on Pexels.com

5. All the baby boys two years old and younger were killed around the Bethlehem/Jerusalem area by Herod. (Matthew 2:16-18 & Jeremiah 31:15). Jeremiah was written between 626-586 B. C.

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Aristotle was a Grecian philosopher who influenced all our thinking in the west. Photo by Josiah Lewis on Pexels.com

If you remember Aristotle said if we want to prove something, we only need three reasons or arguments to prove it is true. However, Matthew already has five here. Matthew is giving so much evidence that is it overwhelming! And guess what, he isn’t finished. If you know anyone who isn’t so sure that God exists, Jesus is the son of God, or that the Bible is from God. You need to sit down with them and read this story and trace the prophecies to the Old Testament because this is just the beginning of what is in the Bible, and what Matthew has to say to us, and just this much is amazing. You only have to ask, “How did those people know so many years ahead of time what would happen?” There is only one answer, “God really does exist, the Bible is from God, and Jesus is his son.”

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The gypsies are originally from India, but now the emperor, the king, and the princess of the gypsies are in Sibiu, Romania. I also saw the funeral of the queen mother of the gypsies and used to see her walking in the street everyday smoking a pipe. Photo by Anubhaw Anand on Pexels.com

The events that happened during this time around Herod can be proved through history. They are not only written about in the Bible. Herod really did kill all those children. People really were sent to Bethlehem to register to pay taxes which was why Mary and Joseph went to Bethlehem. History records it. History also talks about men from India who could read the stars because it was their main occupation to study the stars. They were followers of Zoroaster. His followers eventually left India and became known as the gypsies. Yes, gypsies believe in God. Many have decided they like the devil better, but many follow God. The ones who purposely have decided they like the devil have given the gypsies a bad name. However, I met the Princess of the gypsies in Sibiu, Romania, where I used to live. I went to her house for tea. The Pentecostal church met in a store front that she owned, and her apartment was behind the store front. She invited me to church. She does believe in God, and so did these men who came from India the ancestors of the gypsies. .

While trying to put this blog out today, WordPress was really doing strange things to my work. If you find anything that doesn’t look right, let me know. I think I caught all the quirks in the computer today, but it was difficult, and I just had to persevere and not give up. If something doesn’t make sense, tell me. Perhaps I should try doing two verses at once.

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